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Gizmo Potential Energy On Shelves Answersl


Gizmo Potential Energy On Shelves Answersl




If you are looking for a fun and interactive way to learn about potential energy, you might want to try the Gizmo Potential Energy on Shelves simulation. This Gizmo allows you to explore how the height and mass of an object affect its gravitational potential energy, or GPE. GPE is the energy an object has because of its position above the ground. The higher an object is, the more GPE it has. The more massive an object is, the more GPE it has as well.


In the Gizmo, you can drag different objects, such as a ball, a paper, and a clip, to different shelves on a wall. You can then view the potential energy of each object on a bar chart or a table. You can also compare the potential energy of different objects at the same height, or the same object at different heights. You can even drop the objects from the shelves and watch them fall to the ground, converting their potential energy into kinetic energy, or the energy of motion.


Download: https://t.co/GZgUpxXfx5


The Gizmo Potential Energy on Shelves is a great tool to help you understand the concept of potential energy and how it relates to gravity. You can also use it to answer some questions that might come up in your physics class or homework. For example, you might wonder how much work it takes to lift an object to a certain height, or how much energy is released when an object falls from a certain height. You can find out by using the Gizmo and applying some formulas.


Work is the amount of energy transferred by a force acting on an object over a distance. In this case, the force is gravity and the distance is the height of the shelf. The formula for work is:


W = Fd


where W is work, F is force, and d is distance. The force of gravity on an object is equal to its weight, which is the product of its mass and the acceleration due to gravity (g). The acceleration due to gravity on Earth is about 9.8 m/s. So, the formula for weight is:


W = mg


where W is weight, m is mass, and g is acceleration due to gravity. Combining these two formulas, we get:


W = mgd


This means that the work done by gravity on an object is equal to its mass times the acceleration due to gravity times the height of the shelf. This also means that the work done by gravity on an object is equal to its potential energy at that height. So, we can write:


PE = mgd


This formula shows that the potential energy of an object depends on its mass and its height above the ground.


Now, let's say you want to find out how much work it takes to lift a 1-kg ball from the ground to a 4-m shelf. You can use the Gizmo to check that the ball's potential energy at that height is 39 J. You can also use the formula above to calculate it:


PE = mgd PE = (1 kg)(9.8 m/s)(4 m) PE = 39.2 J


This means that it takes 39.2 J of work to lift the ball to that height. It also means that if you drop the ball from that height, it will have 39.2 J of kinetic energy when it hits the ground.


Kinetic energy is the energy an object has because of its motion. The formula for kinetic energy is:


KE = (1/2)mv


where KE is kinetic energy, m is mass, and v is velocity. Velocity is the speed and direction of an object's motion. When an object falls from a certain height, its velocity increases as it accelerates due to gravity. The final velocity of an object right before it hits the ground can be found by using this formula:


v = v0 + 2gd


where v is the final velocity, v0 is the initial velocity, g is the acceleration due to gravity, and d is the distance fallen. The initial velocity of an object that is dropped from rest is zero, so we can simplify the formula to:


v = 2gd


This formula shows that the final velocity of an object depends on the height from which it falls. The higher it falls, the faster it goes.


Now, let's say you want to find out how fast the 1-kg ball is going when it hits the ground after falling from the 4-m shelf. You can use the Gizmo to measure that the ball's velocity at that point is about 8.8 m/s. You can also use the formula above to calculate it:


v = 2gd v = (2)(9.8 m/s)(4 m) v = 78.4 m/s v = 78.4 m/s v = 8.9 m/s


This means that the ball's velocity right before it hits the ground is 8.9 m/s. You can also use this value to find the ball's kinetic energy at that point:


KE = (1/2)mv KE = (1/2)(1 kg)(8.9 m/s) KE = 39.6 J


This means that the ball's kinetic energy right before it hits the ground is 39.6 J. This is very close to the ball's potential energy at the 4-m shelf, which was 39.2 J. This shows that energy is conserved when an object falls from a certain height. The potential energy that the object has at the top is converted into kinetic energy as it falls.


The Gizmo Potential Energy on Shelves can help you explore these concepts and more. You can experiment with different objects, heights, and scenarios, and see how they affect the potential and kinetic energy of the objects. You can also answer some questions that are provided in the Gizmo, or make up your own questions and use the Gizmo to find the answers.


If you want to try the Gizmo Potential Energy on Shelves for yourself, you can find it on [this website]. You will need to create an account and log in to access it. You can also find more information and instructions on how to use it on [this page]. Have fun and learn a lot!


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